Teasel paperweight large

Teasel (Dipsacus Fullonum) Teasels are easily identified with their prickly stem and leaves, and the inflorescence of purple, dark pink or lavender flowers that form a head on the end of the stem(s). The dried head persists after flowering, with the small (4–6 millimetres (0.16–0.24 in)) seeds maturing in mid autumn. As the name implies, it was used extensively by Fullers for the teasing of wool and fabrics and was much preferred to the alternative wire hooks. The seeds are an important winter food resource for some birds, notably the European goldfinch. Teasels are often grown in gardens and encouraged on some nature reserves to attract them.

700,-